mithriltabby: Parodies of Communist art (Meowist Revolution)
[personal profile] mithriltabby

As usual, I’ve done my research for the upcoming election and written up my notes to share with the rest of the class. I’ve given my conclusions, and invite you to come to your own. Even if we disagree on every issue, I’m happy if this saves you a headache.

Voter-Nominated Offices

Here we see the mess created by 2010’s Proposition 14, which created the “top two” primary. (As I wrote at the time, we should be using ranked-choice voting for this.) Because of the nature of the “jungle” primary, we have to treat it like a general election; if 4 members of party A each get 15% of the vote and 2 members of party B each get 16%, that means that the race in the general election is between two members of party B even though 60% of the population would prefer party A. So this is not the time to engage in protest votes. If you would like to see a better system implemented, I commend your attention to Californians for Electoral Reform; meanwhile, vote strategically.

Governor

This is a mad scramble where most of the candidates don’t stand a chance. Polls suggest that the ones to take seriously are Newsom, Villaraigosa, Chiang, Cox, and Allen, likely with a Republican facing off against Newsom in November.

  1. Hakan “Hawk” Mikado. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  2. Albert Caesar Mezzetti. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  3. Gavin Newsom. Democrat. Current lieutenant governor. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco Chronicle, Mercury News, Sacramento Bee, Sierra Club, Loma Prieta Chapter. Had an affair with his appointments secretary a decade ago, for which he has apologized, and has apparently cleaned up his act since; it still doesn’t speak well for his character. I’m not thrilled with him, but he seems to be the best of the viable candidates.
  4. Robert C. Newman, II. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  5. Josh Jones. Green. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  6. J. Bribiesca. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  7. Gloria Estela La Riva. Peace and Freedom. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  8. Peter Y. Liu. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  9. Antonio Villaraigosa. Democrat. Former Mayor of Los Angeles. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Los Angeles Times. Had an extramarital affair with a television reporter a decade ago when he was Mayor of Los Angeles.
  10. Yvonne Girard. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  11. Robert Davidson Griffis. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  12. Shubham Goel. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  13. Travis Allen. Republican. Assemblyman. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Accused of sexual harassment while in the state legislature in 2013.
  14. Akinyemi Agbede. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  15. Johnny Wattenburg. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  16. Nickolas Wildstar. Libertarian. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Libertarian Party of California.
  17. Desmond Silveira. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  18. Michael Shellenberger. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  19. Zoltan Istvan. Libertarian. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Libertarian Party of California.
  20. Christopher N. Carlson. Green. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  21. Thomas Jefferson Cares. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  22. John Chiang. Democrat. Current state treasurer. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Sacramento Bee.
  23. John H. Cox. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by Donald Trump.
  24. Amanda Renteria. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  25. Delaine Eastin. Democrat. Former State Assemblywoman and State Superintendent of Public Instruction. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco Bay Guardian, San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters.
    She took the time to come out to talk to us at the Democratic Club of Sunnyvale and I like her— she is blunt and practical. Her support of rent control is short-sighted, though.
  26. Jeffrey Edward Taylor. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  27. Klement Tinaj. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.

Lieutenant Governor

I can’t find polling for this race, but the candidates who have raised over $1m are: Bleich, Kounalakis, Harris, Hernandez.

  1. Eleni Kounalakis. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the California League of Conservation Voters, Sacramento Bee.
  2. Cameron Gharabiklou. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  3. Tim Ferreira. Libertarian. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Libertarian Party of California.
  4. David Fennell. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  5. Danny Thomas. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  6. Cole Harris. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Republican Party of California.
  7. Ed Hernandez. Democrat. Current state senator. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California.
  8. David R. Hernandez. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  9. Lydia Ortega. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  10. Gayle McLaughlin. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco Bay Guardian, San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters.
  11. Jeff Bleich. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco Chronicle, Mercury News, Sacramento Bee, Sierra Club, Loma Prieta Chapter.

Secretary of State

Padilla is the only candidate to raise over $100k; Meuser and Major the only ones to raise over $10k.

  1. Mark P. Meuser. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Republican Party of California.
  2. Alex Padilla. Democrat. Incumbent. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco Chronicle, Sacramento Bee, San Francisco Bay Guardian, San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters, California Democratic Party, California League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, Loma Prieta Chapter, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California.
  3. Gail K. Lightfoot. Libertarian. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Libertarian Party of California.
  4. C.T. Weber. Peace and Freedom. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  5. Erik Rydberg. Green. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  6. Raul Rodriguez, Jr. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Trump supporter.
  7. Michael Feinstein. Green. Former mayer of Santa Monica. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  8. Ruben Major. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.

Controller

  1. Betty Yee. Democrat. Incumbent. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco Chronicle, Mercury News, Sacramento Bee, San Francisco Bay Guardian, San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters, California Democratic Party, California League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, Loma Prieta Chapter, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California.
  2. Konstantinos Roditis. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Republican Party of California.
  3. Mary Lou Finley. Peace and Freedom. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.

Treasurer

Ma has raised over $1m, Viswanathan over $100k, Conlon under $10k.

  1. Greg Conlon. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Sacramento Bee.
  2. Fiona Ma. Democrat. Chairwoman of the Board of Equalization. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco Chronicle, Sacramento Bee, California Democratic Party, California League of Conservation Voters, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California.
  3. Vivek Viswanathan. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Mercury News. The Mercury’s editorial is well worth reading and made this a difficult choice.
  4. Jack Guerrero. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  5. Kevin Akin. Peace and Freedom. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters.

Attorney General

I can’t find polling data on this race, but looking at the money race on Voter’s Edge, it looks like Jones and Becerra are in the lead right now.

  1. Eric Early. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  2. Dave Jones. Democrat. State Insurance Commissioner. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Mercury News, Sacramento Bee, San Francisco Bay Guardian, San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters. I find the Mercury’s editorial persuasive, but will have no qualms about voting for Becerra in November.
  3. Steven Bailey. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Republican Party of California.
  4. Xavier Becerra. Democrat. Incumbent. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco Chronicle, Sacramento Bee, San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters, Sierra Club, Loma Prieta Chapter, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California.

Insurance Commissioner

  1. Asif Mahmood. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  2. Steve Poizner. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco Chronicle, Mercury News, Sacramento Bee.
    When running for governor in 2010, he went far right on immigration, apparently to win the Republican nomination over Meg Whitman. And why did he spend half a million dollars of his own money on his campaign? He apparently did a great job the last time he was insurance commissioner, but he wouldn’t be the first dude to traipse out of touch with reality after overexposure to politics.
  3. Ricardo Lara. Democrat. State senator. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Sacramento Bee, California Democratic Party, California League of Conservation Voters, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California.
  4. Nathalie Hrizi. Peace and Freedom. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters.

Member, State Board of Equalization, District 2

  1. Barry Chang. Democrat. Former mayor of Cupertino. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. I’ve heard him speak in person and have the impression that he’s a “does not play well with others” type who might be effective in an executive role— he is refreshingly blunt— but lacks diplomatic skill.
  2. Malia Cohen. Democrat. Supervisor, City and County of San Francisco. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. She supported the reforms to the Board proposed by Betty Yee and Fiona Ma, so she knows what she’s getting into. She also has the sense to put issues on the front page of her web site, telling me that she is closer to my policy-wonk heart than her main competitor, Galgiani.
  3. Mark Burns. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Republican Party of California.
  4. Cathleen Galgiani. Democrat. State senator. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.

United States Senator

Current polling says the ones to take seriously are Feinstein, De La Fuente, de León, Cruz, Bradley, and Little.

  1. Alison Hartson. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  2. Jason Hanania. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  3. David Hildebrand. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  4. Lee Olson. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  5. Roque “Rocky” De La Fuente. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  6. Kevin de León. Democrat. President of the state senate. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Sacramento Bee, San Francisco Bay Guardian, San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters. Feinstein has enough of a lead that I expect her to be on the ballot in November; I don’t know if de León can make it, but I want a senator whose views on encryption have made it past 1950.
  7. Kevin Mottus. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  8. David Moore. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  9. Mario Nabliba. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  10. Gerald Plummer. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  11. Tom Palzer. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  12. John Thompson Parker. Peace and Freedom. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  13. Douglas Howard Pierce. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  14. Herbert G. Peters. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  15. James P. Bradley. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  16. Arun K. Bhumitra. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  17. Jerry Joseph Laws. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  18. Patrick Little. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  19. Tim Gildersleeve. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  20. Michael Fahmy Girgis. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  21. Don J. Grundmann. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  22. Rash Bihari Ghosh. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  23. Ling Ling Shi. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  24. John “Jack” Crew. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  25. Erin Cruz. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  26. Derrick Michael Reid. Libertarian. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Libertarian Party of California.
  27. Dianne Feinstein. Democrat. Incumbent. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco Chronicle, Mercury News, Los Angeles Times, Sacramento Bee. 100% score from Planned Parenthood Action Fund. She released a draft bill that is deeply ignorant of the realities of digital security a couple of years ago, and I see no sign that she has acquired more competent technical advice since. If de León doesn’t make it onto the ballot in November, I will vote for her.
  28. Colleen Shea Fernald. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  29. Adrienne Nicole Edwards. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  30. Paul A. Taylor. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  31. Donnie O. Turner. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  32. Pat Harris. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.

United States Representative, District 17

  1. Kennita Watson. Libertarian. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Libertarian Party of California.
  2. Ron Cohen. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Republican Party of California
  3. Stephen Forbes. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  4. Khanh Tran. Democrat. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  5. Ro Khanna. Democrat. Incumbent. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Mercury News, California Democratic Party, California League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, Loma Prieta Chapter, Planned Parenthood Mar Monte. 100% score from Planned Parenthood Action Fund.

Member of the State Assembly, District 24

  1. Bob Goodwyn. Libertarian. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  2. Alex Glew. Republican. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Republican Party of California.
  3. Marc Berman. Democrat. Incumbent. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the California Democratic Party, Sierra Club, Loma Prieta Chapter, Planned Parenthood Mar Monte.

Nonpartisan Offices

Judicial

Judge of the Superior Court, Office No. 4

Vincent J. Chiarello is the only candidate. Ballotpedia.

Recall Aaron Persky

Aaron Persky (Ballotpedia) made headlines by sentencing a 21-year-old white man to a mere six months in jail for sexually assaulting an unconscious woman behind a Dumpster (which had him out in three months for good behavior). Persky was investigated by the Commission on Judicial Performance and cleared of misconduct. His recall is supported by the Mercury News and Palo Alto Online, and opposed by the San Francisco Chronicle. I’m voting for his recall; for a judge, he is lacking in judgment, and we can do better.

  1. Angela F. Storey. Attorney at Law. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  2. Cindy Seeley Hendrickson. Assistant District Attorney, County of Santa Clara. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. She has more of a track record as a public servant, and a lot more endorsements from known organizations in the Updates section of her campaign page. Coverage in Broadly.

School

Superintendent of Public Instruction

tl;dr: of the two qualified candidates, Tuck is a reformer and Thurmond more incremental.

  1. Marshall Tuck. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the San Francisco Chronicle, Mercury News.
  2. Lily (Espinoza) Ploski. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  3. Steven Ireland. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge.
  4. Tony K. Thurmond. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Los Angeles Times, San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters, California Democratic Party, California League of Conservation Voters, Planned Parenthood Affiliates of California.

County

Assessor

Larry Stone is the only candidate.

District Attorney

Jeff Rosen is the only candidate.

Sheriff

This is an interesting choice because involves the cleanup of a mess in our local Department of Corrections, where a mentally ill inmate was found beaten to death in his cell and three jail deputies were convicted of his murder. All candidates came out to speak at the Democratic Club of Sunnyvale. Coverage in San Jose Inside.

  1. Joe La Jeunesse. Deputy Sheriff. Voter’s Edge. He opposes “sanctuary city” policies. 72% score from Planned Parenthood Mar Monte. He’s a good speaker and comes across as very genuine; was at Abu Ghraib and said the same things that went wrong there are going wrong here; lack of training, accountability, and resources.
  2. Jose Salcido. Public Safety Advisor. Voter’s Edge. A district attorney’s investigation in 2005 concluded that Salcido committed perjury in 2004, but no charges were filed, and he later served as a policy advisor to San Jose Mayor Chuck Reed. No response to Planned Parenthood Mar Monte. Showed very sensible perspective during his talk, mentioning a “therapeutic communities” policy that helps prevent recidivism and noting that police officers need to understand PTSD and that poverty creates PTSD.
  3. Laurie Smith. Incumbent. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Recent polls have her at 24%, with Hirokawa coming in second; a 2017 Mercury column notes a number of failures on her watch. 100% score from Planned Parenthood Mar Monte. Spoke very well; claims Hirokawa froze on the whole Department of Corrections mess.
  4. John Hirokawa. Retired County Undersheriff. Voter’s Edge. Endorsed by the Mercury News, Santa Clara County Democratic Party. 100% score from Planned Parenthood Mar Monte. Very polished; I would have expected “politician”, not “policeman”, from his demeanor, but that may be appropriate for the sheriff of a county this size. Seems reasonably competent, but I saw more plausible, innovative ideas from the other three challengers.
  5. Martin J. Monica. Has been a police chief in Parlier (a town of 15,000) and an officer in San Jose; currently a fifth grade teacher. Voter’s Edge. No response to Planned Parenthood Mar Monte. He comes across as very human and genuine— when asked if he accepted money from the NRA, he simply laughed and said “No. They’re evil.” and let someone ask the next question, instead of taking the opportunity to talk more— and I like his emphasis on education. He would like a separate facility for people with mental health issues because they don’t get rehabilitated in the standard system. I don’t think he’s ready for work of this scale, which is a pity, because I personally like him the best of the candidates.

Measures Submitted to the Voters

State

Proposition 68

A bond measure to raise $4bn for parks, natural resources protection, climate adaptation, water quality and supply, and flood protection. Interest rates are low; it only adds $200m per year to repayment costs if all the bonds are issued. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Legislative Analyst’s Office.

Supported ByOpposed By
Pete Rates the Propositions
California League of Conservation Voters
Sierra Club, Loma Prieta Chapter
League of Women Voters of California
San Francisco Chronicle
Mercury News
Sacramento Bee
Los Angeles Times
San Francisco Bay Guardian
San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters
California Democratic Party
Green Party of California
Orange County Register
Republican Party of California
Libertarian Party of California

We need to invest in our water infrastructure ASAP. Yes.

Proposition 69

Amends the constitution to make sure that money raised by SB1 can only be spent on transportation. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Legislative Analyst’s Office.

Supported ByOpposed By
Yes on 68
Pete Rates the Propositions
League of Women Voters of California
San Francisco Chronicle
Mercury News
Sacramento Bee
Los Angeles Times
Orange County Register
San Francisco Bay Guardian
San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters
California Democratic Party
Green Party of California
Libertarian Party of California

Yes.

Proposition 70

Puts cap-and-trade revenue in a lockbox until the legislature can muster a ⅔ vote to unlock it. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Legislative Analyst’s Office.

Supported ByOpposed By
  Pete Rates the Propositions
League of Women Voters of California
California League of Conservation Voters
Sierra Club, Loma Prieta Chapter
San Francisco Chronicle
Mercury News
Sacramento Bee
Los Angeles Times
Orange County Register
San Francisco Bay Guardian
San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters
California Democratic Party
Republican Party of California
Green Party of California
Libertarian Party of California

We have too many roadblocks in the legislature already. No.

Proposition 71

More and more people are using vote-by-mail (58% in the 2016 general election!) and having all the ballots counted on election night is looking increasingly unlikely. This makes sure that new measures take effect 5 days after certification of the election results by the Secretary of State, rather than 1 day after the election, possibly before all ballots are counted. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Legislative Analyst’s Office.

Supported ByOpposed By
Pete Rates the Propositions
League of Women Voters of California
California League of Conservation Voters
San Francisco Chroncicle
Mercury News
Sacramento Bee
Los Angeles Times
Orange County Register
San Francisco Bay Guardian
San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters
California Democratic Party
Republican Party of California
Green Party of California
Libertarian Party of California

This should help the state avoid expensive lawsuits if an initiative appears to pass and suddenly doesn’t after the final results come in. Yes.

Proposition 72

Adding rainwater capture systems to your property doesn’t trigger reassessment of your taxable value (though it will apply when you sell); this encourages building cisterns. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Legislative Analyst’s Office.

Supported ByOpposed By
League of Women Voters of California
California League of Conservation Voters
San Francisco Chronicle
Mercury News
Sacramento Bee
Los Angeles Times
Orange County Register
San Francisco Bay Guardian
San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters
California Democratic Party
Republican Party of California
Green Party of California
Libertarian Party of California
Pete Rates the Propositions

A small but sensible incentive for water conservation. Yes.

Regional

Regional Measure 3

This will raise bridge tolls on all toll bridges in the Bay Area, other than the Golden Gate Bridge, by $1 in 2019, $1 in 2022, and $1 in 2025, to pay for a wide variety of transit improvements: bringing BART to San Jose, upgrading the Clipper card system, extending Caltrain to the Transbay Terminal, and numerous road improvements. Ballotpedia. Voter’s Edge. Detailed ballot description.

Supported ByOpposed By
San Francisco Chronicle
Mercury News
San Francisco Bay Guardian
San Francisco League of Pissed Off Voters
Palo Alto Online
Libertarian Party of Santa Clara County

A lot of this gets spent on public transit; the upgrade to the Clipper cards will make it feasible to subsidize bridge crossings for low-income workers. Yes.

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